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MatPlus.Net Forum Promenade An ode to coffee (for Marcos Roland, 2016)
 
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(1) Posted by Siegfried Hornecker [Wednesday, May 10, 2017 19:52]

An ode to coffee (for Marcos Roland, 2016)


Original publication: Facebook, 4 September 2016
When Marcos Roland challenged me to write a short poem about coffee, this is what I wrote, and I would like to share it with the MatPlus community.



An Ode to Coffee, or: Do they know it's coffee time at all?

Dedicated to Marcos Roland

The nectar of your roasted beans
runs down my throat, a drop my chin,
you come in many different tastes
you give me strength when I must haste.

Coffee, my ambrosia
you are my Anastasia
you are my power in the night
or when the sun still shines outside.

I hail to thee, but let us think
for just a moment at the brink
of our consciousness of the slaves
that reap those beans until their graves.

Let's find a way to populate
but not genetically manipulate
the coffee so that it may grow
wherever in the north we sow.

Let's give them wealth as they give there
more of the work than they can bear
so that not only we can say
coffee again made my day!
 
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(2) Posted by Hauke Reddmann [Wednesday, May 10, 2017 22:51]

Since Mozart wrote his C-A-F-F-E-E, wouldn't it be
obvious to compose a chess problem with an analog theme
(maybe the pieces stand on c1 a2 f3 f4 e5 e6,
what do I know, use your creativity...)?
 
 
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(3) Posted by Sven Hendrik Lossin [Thursday, May 11, 2017 08:54]

Is there a melody for it?
 
   
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(4) Posted by Branislav Djurašević [Thursday, May 11, 2017 11:06]; edited by Branislav Djurašević [17-05-12]

Branislav DJURASEVIC
scheme-example, study
(= 4+2 )

White to play, black wins

Solution:

1. Kb3 Kd2 2. Kc4 Ke3 3. Kd5 Re8! 4. f5 Kf4! 5. f6 Kf5! (5... Kg5? 6.
f7!=) (5... Rxe5+? 6. Kd6 Kf5 7. f7 Re6+ 8. Kd7=) 6. Kd6 (6. f7 Rd8+-+
(6... Rf8-+)) 6... Kg6 7. f4 Kf7 0-1

Without artistic importance, but with unique solution.

or

Branislav DJURASEVIC
scheme-example, mate in two
(= 4+2 )
#2

1.Qa3! give and take flight key

or the best one

Branislav DJURASEVIC
scheme-example, mate in three
(= 4+2 )
#3
a.) diagram
b.) Bc1-Sc1

a.)
1.Qf3-b7! zugzwang.
1...Ke5-d6 2.Bc1-a3 + Kd6-e5 3.Qb7-e4 #

b.)
1.Sc1-d3+! Ke5-d6 2.Qf3-b7 e6-e5 3.Rf4-f6 #

or this

Branislav DJURASEVIC
scheme-example, helpmate in four
(= 3+3 )
h#4
1.Ke5-d4 Sc1-d3 2.Kd4-c3 Ka2-a3 3.Kc3-c2 Sd3-b4 + 4.Kc2-b1 Rf3-f1 #

but unfortunately black pe6 is not necessary
 
   
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(5) Posted by Geir Sune Tallaksen Østmoe [Thursday, May 11, 2017 14:08]

Another possibility:

(= 3+3 )


White to play, Black draws

1.Kc2 Ka1! 2.Kc3 Kb1 3.Kd3 Kb2 4.Kd4 Kc2 5.Ke4 Kc3 6.Kxf4 Kd4 draws.
 
   
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(6) Posted by Viktoras Paliulionis [Friday, May 12, 2017 12:41]; edited by Viktoras Paliulionis [17-05-12]

Viktoras Paliulionis
Original
(= 3+3 )
h#4
1. Bg7 f5+ 2. Kf6 Bh6 3. Ra7 Kf4 4. Rf7 Bg5#
 
   
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(7) Posted by Geoff Foster [Saturday, May 13, 2017 02:04]

@Viktoras: nice move 2...Bh6 and ideal mate!

(= 3+3 )
h#3
1.Bd5+ Kf2 2.Ke4 Se2 3.Be5 Bb1#

Ideal mate, with one move by each unit.
 
   
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(8) Posted by Geoff Foster [Saturday, May 13, 2017 03:13]

This is so close! I had to add bPh6 to prevent 3.Qh6.

(= 3+4 )
h#4.5*
1.Re3 Sd8 2.Re4 Kb3 3.Kd4 Kb4 4.Qe3 Sc6#
1...Sg2 2.Rf6 Kb3 3.Qg5 Kc4 4.Kf5 Kd5 5.Qg6 Se3#
 
   
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(9) Posted by Geoff Foster [Saturday, May 13, 2017 07:28]

The easiest way is to try all possible positions!

(= 3+3 )
h#2*
1...Bd5+ 2.Ka1 Bxe5#
1.Ba1 Bd6 2.e5 Bd5#

(= 3+3 )
h#2 2.1.1.1
1.e4 Rg2 2.e3 Bd5#
1.Ke4 Kd2 2.f3 Ra4#

(= 3+3 )
h#2.5 2.1.1..
1...Rd2 2.Ke3 Kxe5 3.Rf2 Rd3#
1...Sd3+ 2.Ke4 Sxe5! (Se1?) 3.Re3 Ra4#

(= 3+3 )
h#3 2.1.1..
1.Rd4 Bc4 2.Ke4 Bf1 3.Sd3 Bg2#
1.Sd3 Ba3 2.Ke3 Bc5+ 3.Ke4 Bd5#

(= 3+3 )
h#3 2.1.1..
1.Ke2 Sb4 2.Rf2 Sc2 3.Sf3 Bc4#
1.Ke4 Kd2 2.Kd4 Sc1 3.Re4 Sb3#

(= 3+3 )
h#3.5*
1.Ke3 Sc3 2.Rf3 Sf4 3.Bd2 Sd1#
1...Sc3 2.Rg4 Kf6 3.Be3 Sg5+ 4.Kf4 Se2#

(= 3+3 )
h#3.5 2.1.1..
1...Sd3 2.Ke2 Kxf4 3.Kd1 Ke3 4.Sc3 Bb3#
1...Se2 2.Kg2 Kxf4 3.Kh1 Kg3 4.Sc1 Bd5#
B4 bS tempo moves!

(= 3+3 )
h#3.5 2.1.1..
1...Sd3 2.Ke2 Kxf4 3.Kd1 Ke3 4.Bb3 Bxb3#
1...Se2 2.Kg2 Kxf4 3.Kh1 Kg3 4.Bd5 Bxd5#
B4 bB sacrifices!

(= 3+3 )
h#5 2.1.1..
1.Rb3 Kd5 2.Rf2 Kd4 3.Kb2 axb3 4.Ka3 Kc3 5.Ra2 Bd6#
1.Rb4 Bd6 2.Kb2 Kd5 3.Ka3 Bxb4+ 4.Ka4 Kc4 5.Rb3 axb3#
 
 
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(10) Posted by Branislav Djurašević [Saturday, May 13, 2017 07:30]; edited by Branislav Djurašević [17-05-13]

It seems that in helpmate genre is more artistic opportunity. Bravo for authors of these problems!

Here I publish once more in ortodox manner. I am not satisfied with the most of my problems (schemes) here (see also previous post), but I want to attract other composers to join us.

B. Djurašević, scheme
(= 3+3 )
#4
a.) diagram
b.) Be6-Se6
c.) Be6-Re6 (#3)

Solutions:

a.)

1.Be6-b3? (2.Qa2-c2#) Bf3-e4 2.Ke5*e4 f4-f3 3.Qa2-c2#
but 1...Bf3-d1!

1.Ke5-d4! (2.Kd4-c3/2.Be6-b3)
1...Kc1-d1 2.Kd4-c3 (3.Qa2-d2#) Kd1-e1 3.Be6-c4 (4.Qa2-d2#) Bf3-e2 4.Qa2*e2 #
1...Bf3-d5 2.Be6*d5 Kc1-d1 3.Kd4-d3 etc.


b.)

1.Se6-d4! (2.Qa2-c2#) Kc1-d1 2.Sd4*f3 Kd1-c1 3.Ke5~ zugzwang.
1...Bf3-d1 2.Ke5*f4
2...Bd1-a4 3.Kf4-e3 (threat:4.Qa2-a1#) Bd1-c2 4.Qa2*c2#
2...Bd1-b3 3.Sd4*b3+ Kc1-d1 4.Qa2-d2 #
(1...Bf3-e4 2.Sd4-b3+ Kc1-d1 3.Qa2-d2#)

c.)

1. Re6-g6? Bf3-d1 2. Re6-c6+, 1...Bf3-e2 2.Qa2*e2, 1... Bf3-g4 2. Rg6*g4, but 1...Bf3-h5!!
1. Re6-d6? Bf3-d5!
1. Re6-b6! (2.Rb6-b1#) Bf3-e4 2.Ke5*e4
 
 
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MatPlus.Net Forum Promenade An ode to coffee (for Marcos Roland, 2016)